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November 26, 2013

The Fundamentals of Iron Condors

Have you ever noticed a professional athlete warming up before a game or match? What are they doing? They are stretching, running, throwing and catching just to name a few for example. What they are really doing is working on the fundamentals. To be good at anything requires learning the fundamentals and constantly working on them throughout your career no matter what your career is.

Option trading is no different. Even traders who have traded for years, who trade complex strategies return to the fundamentals to make their trading decisions. Take trading iron condors. Trading iron condors requires utilizing the fundamentals. Traders who are trading iron condors are trading a fairly complex, four-legged option strategy. They need to be able to visualize the strategy in order to analyze it and ultimately decide whether or not they should be trading iron condors or something else.

Traders trading iron condors should consider the spread from several different perspectives. Specifically, they should consider it as combinations of other spreads. When a trader is trading iron condors, the trader is in fact trading a pair of credit spreads. An iron condor is a put credit spread combined with a call credit spread. That’s one way to look at it.

Trading iron condors can also be considered from the strangle-trading perspective. An iron condor is a short strangle combined with a long strangle with wider strikes. The profit (and risk) comes from the short strangle, while the long one provides protection.

An iron condor can also be thought of as four individual option positions. Traders trading iron condors have a position in a long put, in a short put, in a short call and in a long call. Thinking of trading iron condors from this perspective, in particular, can help traders make adjustment and closing decision more effectively.

And, of course, an iron condor is, well, an iron condor! It is a single strategy in which the risk can be observed on a P&(L) diagram or through the greeks.

This strategy-break-down technique is not just suited for trading iron condors, but for trading all multi-legged strategies. It is an effective analysis technique similar to how car shoppers consider buying a car. They look at the front; then walk around to the side, then the back; they look under the hood and at the interior. All the while, they are considering this one purchase, but just from many different perspectives. Doing this on every potential trade can only improve your odds.

John Kmiecik

Senior Options Instructor

Market Taker Mentoring

November 21, 2013

Long Calls and Bull Call Spreads in AAPL

Purchasing a Call vs. Bull Call Spread

With the Dow and S&P 500 at all-time highs recently, it probably made sense to have at least a moderately bullish bias towards many stocks. The market is due for some type of pullback but whose to say it won’t continue on its bullish pace. Even if it does pullback sooner than later, there will be another bullish opportunity at some point. Is there a way that you can take advantage of this bullish investing scenario while limiting risk? Certainly, there are a couple. One that may be a better option compared to the rest is the bull call spread. To learn to trade this strategy and more in detail please visit our website for details.

Definition

When implementing a bull call, a trader purchases call options at one strike and sells the same number of calls on the same company at a higher strike with the same expiration date. Let’s use Apple Inc. (AAPL) which is currently trading around $515 as an example. In this case you would purchase December calls at the 515 at-the-money strike at the ask price of $13. You would then sell the same number of December calls with a higher strike price, in this case 535 at the bid, $4.

The Math

The trader’s maximum profit in the bull call spread is limited; he can make as much as the difference between the strike prices less the net debit paid. For simplicity, let’s assume that he purchased one December 515 call and sold one December 535 call resulting in a net debit of $9 (that’s $13 – $4). The difference in the strike prices is $20 (535 – 515). He would subtract 9 from 20 to end up with a maximum profit of $11 per contract. So if he traded 10 contracts, you could make $11,000.

Although he limited his upside, the trader also limited the downside to the net debit of $9 per contract. To simply breakeven, the stock would have to trade at $524 (the strike price of the purchased call (515) plus net debit ($9)) at expiration.

Advantage versus Purchasing a Call

When trading the long call, a trader’s downside is limited to the net premium paid. If he simply purchased the at-the-money December 515 call he would have paid $14. The potential loss is, therefore, greater when implementing a call-buying strategy. If he had moved to a call with a longer time frame to expiration, he would have even paid more for the option. This would also increase his potential loss per option.

Conclusion

By implementing a bull call spread, traders can hedge their bets – limiting the potential loss. This is the advantage when comparing to purchasing a call outright. Remember that there are no sure-fire ways to make money by using options. However, knowing and understanding the strategy is a good way to limit losses.

John Kmiecik

Senior Options Instructor

Market Taker Mentoring

November 14, 2013

The Best Online Trader Community in the World!

Thank you all for your overwhelming support for our brand new MTM Elite Trader’s Community. I’m glad to say the launch of this state-of-the-art traders’ resource was a HUGE success! We promised you the best trader chat room ever to exist… And we delivered!

The new MTM Elite Traders Community has been referred to as “Facebook for traders”. It’s built with modern social network technology and look and feel. You can “like” posts of people and comment on them. There have been some lively discussions and a flurry of trade ideas. It truly is traders helping traders.

The first Community Members that joined this week have been great! A SPECIAL THANKS to you and all your feedback. We got some really great, positive comments, like, “Just signed up. Like what I’m seeing here so far!” and “The share feature is awesome! I’m only using it right now for FB & TWTR, but there are almost 300 social media options. Wow!”

And, we took into account some initial feedback and made a few changes to make it even better and easier to use than we initially planned.

So if you haven’t had a chance to join this incredible online trader community, now is a great time to start. We are offering it for half price right now. Plus you’ll get complimentary access to our popular class Exiting Options Positions for Maximum Profit (a $197 value) just for signing up. AND, the person who contributes the most will win an iPad. Winner announced December 15.

JOIN US today!

MarketTaker.com/Join_Us

Dan Passarelli

CEO, Market Taker Mentoring, Inc.

November 7, 2013

A Discussion About Put Options

There has been significant talk recently about a potential market pullback but so far market participants have remained relatively bullish. Whether it happens tomorrow or well into the future, there is a time when the market and every stock will lose value. If a trader buys a put option, he or she has the right to sell the underlying at a particular price (strike price) before a certain time (expiration). If a trader owns 100 shares of stock and purchases a put option, the trader may be able to protect the position fully or to some degree because he or she will have the right to sell the stock at the strike price by expiration even if the shares lose value.

A lot of traders especially those who are just learning to trade options can be enthralled by put options especially buying the shortest-term, or front month put for protection. The problem, however, is that there is a flaw to the reasoning of purchasing front-month puts as protection. Front-month contracts have a higher theta (time decay) and relying on front-month puts to protect a straight stock purchase is not necessarily the best way to protect the stock. If you were to continually purchase front-month puts as protection, that can end up being a rather expensive way to by insurance.

Although front month options are often cheaper, they are not always your best bet. The idea may be sound, the trader purchases a number of shares of the stock and purchases out-of-the-money puts to protect his or her position; but sound reasoning does not always lead to good practice. Here’s an example.

We will use a hypothetical trade. The stock is trading a slightly above 13 and our hypothetical trader wants to own the stock because he or she thinks the stock will beat its earnings’ estimates in each of the next two quarters. This investment will take at least six months as the trader wants to allow the news events to move the stock higher.

Being a smart options trader, our stock trader wants some insurance against a potential drop in the stock just in case. The trader decides to buy a slightly out-of-the-money April14 13 put, which carries an ask price of $0.50 (rounded for simplicity purposes). That 0.50 premium represents almost 4 percent of the current stock price. In fact, if the investor rolled option month after month, it would create a big dent in the initial outlay of cash. To be sure, after about seven months (assuming the stock hangs around $13) the trader would lose more than 25 percent on the $13 investment.

If the stock drops in price, then the ultimate rationalization for the strategy is realized; protection. The put provides a hedge. The value of the option will increase as the stock drops, which can offset the loss suffered as the stock drops. Buying the put is a hedge and and a solid insurance policy – though, albeit, an expensive one. Investors can usually find better ways to protect a stock.

John Kmiecik

Senior Options Instructor

Market Taker Mentoring